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Winter Mood Imbalances Related to Vitamin D Levels

Autumn is in full swing and winter is around the corner. With these changes, vitamin D levels among the population on the North American continent north of the Mexico border drop. The fact is above the 45th parallel it is reported that from November to February/March, even on a sunny blue-sky day, the angle of the sun is such that vitamin D production when bare skin is exposed is dramatically diminished. 


Many of us experience shifts in mood during the winter months. To offset winter mood imbalances, I recommend that my patients have their vitamin D 25 OH levels measured. The range is 20-100 for most laboratories. Yet, falling within the range does not necessarily mean you are good to go. My patients often target a blood level of at least 55, for a 25 OH vitamin D blood test. Of course the target blood range is different for everyone, and one’s health care provider can best determine what the best range is for a given individual. 

It’s interesting that many patients come into our practice with a vitamin D level in the modestly adequate range. Yet, at closer examination, their tests were conducted in July, August or September; after a summer of potential sun exposure. The problem is that generally it is all downhill from there, as summer stores of vitamin D generally don’t remain at the same levels until spring. So, keeping track of vitamin D levels throughout the year is critical for those serious about gleaning the benefits of vitamin D year-around.

This article was published on Thursday December 08, 2011.
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by Chris D. Meletis, ND